NewsDay Crossword October 23 2021 Answers – Daily Celebrity Crossword Answers

By | October 23, 2021

The Times crossword puzzle is a British daily cryptic crossword popularised by its inclusion in the London newspaper The Times and inspired by similarly themed puzzles published in The New York Tribune since 1925. It is also one of the most widely distributed crosswords globally today.

The first crossword puzzle ever to appear in a nationally distributed newspaper was “Word-Cross”, which ran in the New York Sunday World on November 10, 1924. Will Weng, who was then the puzzles editor at the “New York Tribune”, had been approached by Walter Murphy, the editor of the Sunday supplement, with an idea for a new feature that would attract more readers to his section on Sundays; he wanted something like a combination of code and chess problems and believed.

Below we have just shared NewsDay Crossword October 23 2021 Answers. Crosswords are a great way of passing your free time and keep your brain engaged with something. There are plenty of crosswords which you can play but in this post we have shared NewsDay Crossword October 23 2021 Answers.

ACROSS

  • Went off with a bang

    BLEWUP

  • Drove home

    STRESSED

  • Update say

    REVISE

  • Trattorias tiny toast

    CROSTINI

  • Theyre made for correction

    AMENDS

  • Balloonists devices

    RIPCORDS

  • No longer available

    GONE

  • Break in the action

    TRUCE

  • Cheat in a kids game

    PEEK

  • Potentially offensive

    UNPC

  • Huskys opposite

    LANKY

  • What certain drops are

    MEDS

  • Stand-in for absentees

    ETAL

  • Vatican to geographers

    ENCLAVE

  • Return to your base

    TAGUP

  • Decoration candidate

    HERO

  • Construction site carrier

    HOD

  • Above-center piano key

    TREBLEC

  • Serving in a paper cup

    SNOCONE

  • Comic Con costumes

    ETS

  • First Prophet of Islam

    ADAM

  • Master of psychological drama

    MAMET

  • Embodiment of nonappreciation

    INGRATE

  • Worlds largest brickmaker

    LEGO

  • Text with your phone

    PING

  • Woody source of wines

    ELDER

  • Slavic Johannes

    IVAN

  • By and by

    ANON

  • Big name on cake boxes

    HINES

  • Carbs around fillings

    PITA

  • Solemn assurance

    IPROMISE

  • Slam dunks a challenge

    ACESIT

  • Log-shaped desserts

    NUTROLLS

  • Fare well

    THRIVE

  • Points to the sky

    STEEPLES

  • Added relish to

    ZESTED

DOWN

  • French zipper (no not a minor boast)

    BRAGUETTE

  • Wedge-shaped dessert

    LEMONTART

  • They tell only half the story

    EVENPAGES

  • NPR brand extension

    WINECLUB

  • What about .75 GBP can buy

    USD

  • Word from the Latin for crush

    PESTLE

  • Walk-on-gravel sound

    SCRUNCH

  • Slow flows

    TRICKLES

  • Hammock-mending material

    ROPEYARN

  • Key to getting out

    ESC

  • Jokesters preamble

    STOPME

  • Emphatic ending

    SIREE

  • Wound up

    ENDED

  • Inedible chips frequently

    DISKS

  • Oversaw

    RAN

  • Racing engine sound

    VOOM

  • Get ready for work

    PLAN

  • Outpatient perk

    HOMEVISIT

  • Uncommon bank deposit

    ONEGATIVE

  • Went off with a bang

    DETONATED

  • Escarpment site of an English Civil War battle

    EDGEHILL

  • Six-decade game show panelist in A Night at the Opera

    CARLISLE

  • Two-legged tools

    CALIPERS

  • Much __ is divinest Sense: Dickinson

    MADNESS

  • Brush off

    IGNORE

  • Nights end

    TEE

  • Simulated

    ERSATZ

  • Considerable effort

    PAINS

  • Cable router connection

    INPUT

  • Punto cardinal

    NORTE

  • Water mover/remover

    MOP

  • Nickname thats Argentine for Dude!

    CHE

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The crossword-puzzle fad that followed eventually led to the creation of many similar puzzles in other newspapers, including some with distinctly different rules from the “New York Times”.

By 1930, Weng felt that the puzzle was growing stale. He wanted to shake things up a bit by adding an entire new level of challenge on top of what had been there before.

Weng called upon his friend Margaret Farrar (1904–1974) to help him edit and construct a brand-new cryptic crossword which would appear for the first time on Sunday January 2, 1932. The puzzle required entrants not only to fill in standard synonym squares but also to answer clues which required them to solve a second level.

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