NewsDay Crossword October 8 2021 Answers

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The Times crossword puzzle is a British daily cryptic crossword popularised by its inclusion in the London newspaper The Times and inspired by similarly themed puzzles published in The New York Tribune since 1925. It is also one of the most widely distributed crosswords globally today.

The first crossword puzzle ever to appear in a nationally distributed newspaper was “Word-Cross”, which ran in the New York Sunday World on November 10, 1924. Will Weng, who was then the puzzles editor at the “New York Tribune”, had been approached by Walter Murphy, the editor of the Sunday supplement, with an idea for a new feature that would attract more readers to his section on Sundays; he wanted something like a combination of code and chess problems and believed.

Below we have just shared NewsDay Crossword October 8 2021 Answers. Crosswords are a great way of passing your free time and keep your brain engaged with something. There are plenty of crosswords which you can play but in this post we have shared NewsDay Crossword October 8 2021 Answers.

ACROSS

  • Paid pitches

    ADS

  • Mishandled

    ABUSED

  • Side for a sandwich

    SLAW

  • Dude!

    BRO

  • Let off steam

    VENTED

  • Name on the cover of Beloved

    TONI

  • Start of a Charles Schulz quote

    LIFEISLIKE

  • Makes unfair

    RIGS

  • Northwestern Universitys home

    EVANSTON

  • Country singer Steve

    EARLE

  • Stand still say

    REST

  • Part 2 of quote

    ATENSPEED

  • Transistor radio descendant

    IPOD

  • Web prowlers

    BOTS

  • Plaid pattern

    TARTAN

  • __ Code (podcast on opera)

    ARIA

  • Biopic role for Benicio

    CHE

  • Part 3 of quote

    BICYCLEMOSTOFUS

  • Exercise advocacy org.

    AMA

  • About 35 ounces

    KILO

  • Kid-lit equine

    EEYORE

  • Prohibitions

    BANS

  • Folds in

    ADDS

  • Part 4 of quote

    HAVEGEARS

  • Theyre opened in bars

    TABS

  • Kid-lit party crasher

    ALICE

  • Professor for instance

    ACADEMIC

  • Zip

    ZERO

  • End of quote

    WENEVERUSE

  • Reason for reviewing

    EXAM

  • Amusingly unexpected

    IRONIC

  • Prince for one

    SON

  • Draw for spending

    SALE

  • Where the Wild Things Are author

    SENDAK

  • GPS reading

    ENE

DOWN

  • Less inept

    ABLER

  • Charitable effort

    DRIVE

  • Theyre often sleepers

    SOFAS

  • Zipcar sister brand

    AVIS

  • Unsurpassed

    BEST

  • Get rid of fast

    UNLOAD

  • Be miserly

    STINT

  • Squealy sound

    EEK

  • FDR commander

    DDE

  • Boot loops

    STRAPS

  • Longest river of France

    LOIRE

  • Approach to a story

    ANGLE

  • Saw the light with up

    WISED

  • Real thing

    ENTITY

  • With a many-acre home

    ESTATED

  • Long river of Spain

    EBRO

  • Talked much (about)

    NOISED

  • Combo deal

    PACKAGE

  • How some degrees are earned

    ONLINE

  • TV listings letters

    TBA

  • Set ones sights

    AIM

  • Elvis record label

    RCA

  • Limas I love

    AMO

  • Boss-to-be often

    CFO

  • Half of a Wallace epic title

    HUR

  • Ending like -ian

    ESE

  • Disney fjord crosser

    ELSA

  • Raw-bar selection

    OYSTER

  • Evolve into

    BECOME

  • Hit the heights

    ASCEND

  • Fuzzy states of mind

    HAZES

  • Echos voice

    ALEXA

  • Epidemiological adjective

    VIRAL

  • Wouldnt shut up

    RANON

  • Keep entertained

    AMUSE

  • Beefalos parent

    BISON

  • Anything viewed

    SCENE

  • Nike rival

    AVIA

  • Liner elevator stop

    DECK

  • State on L. Superior

    WIS

  • Poor Richard preposition

    ERE

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The crossword-puzzle fad that followed eventually led to the creation of many similar puzzles in other newspapers, including some with distinctly different rules from the “New York Times”.

By 1930, Weng felt that the puzzle was growing stale. He wanted to shake things up a bit by adding an entire new level of challenge on top of what had been there before.

Weng called upon his friend Margaret Farrar (1904–1974) to help him edit and construct a brand-new cryptic crossword which would appear for the first time on Sunday January 2, 1932. The puzzle required entrants not only to fill in standard synonym squares but also to answer clues which required them to solve a second level.

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