USA Today Crossword November 3 2021 Answers – Daily Celebrity Crossword Answers

By | November 3, 2021

The Times crossword puzzle is a British daily cryptic crossword popularised by its inclusion in the London newspaper The Times and inspired by similarly themed puzzles published in The New York Tribune since 1925. It is also one of the most widely distributed crosswords globally today.

The first crossword puzzle ever to appear in a nationally distributed newspaper was “Word-Cross”, which ran in the New York Sunday World on November 10, 1924. Will Weng, who was then the puzzles editor at the “New York Tribune”, had been approached by Walter Murphy, the editor of the Sunday supplement, with an idea for a new feature that would attract more readers to his section on Sundays; he wanted something like a combination of code and chess problems and believed.

In our website you will find all USA Today Crossword November 3 2021 Answers. As you all know USA Today the worldwide famous newspaper also releases a crossword puzzle. You can play it online or by buying the newspaper. We have solved below USA Today Crossword November 3 2021 Answers

ACROSS

  • Not chemically reactive

    INERT

  • Ogun and Osun for example

    GODS

  • Faucets

    TAPS

  • Like defined muscles

    TONED

  • Rotten to the core

    EVIL

  • Doing that now

    ONIT

  • Music score symbols

    CLEFS

  • Drag queen who founded Wigstock

    LADYBUNNY

  • Animal with big ears

    HARE

  • The g in mpg for short

    GAL

  • Deliver a keynote e.g.

    ORATE

  • Super!

    GREAT

  • Place to get pasta salad

    DELI

  • What something sincere might be cloaked in

    LAYERSOFIRONY

  • Late night host Ruffin

    AMBER

  • Olympic fencer Dershwitz

    ELI

  • Sticky substances

    GOOS

  • Spy org. that trained Dan Freeman

    CIA

  • Displayed disgruntlement

    SCOWLED

  • MLB official

    UMP

  • Shout

    YELL

  • Lamb’s mother

    EWE

  • Cinematic award

    OSCAR

  • Fire department unit

    LADDERCOMPANY

  • Have to have

    NEED

  • Nut found beneath an oak tree

    ACORN

  • Put up with

    ABIDE

  • Insect with elbow-shaped antennae

    ANT

  • Mixes in

    ADDS

  • Bottom of the barrel moneywise

    LASTPENNY

  • Eagle’s sudden move

    SWOOP

  • Pest on a poodle

    FLEA

  • Governor’s override

    VETO

  • Bring It On actress Dushku

    ELIZA

  • Visa alternative for short

    AMEX

  • Bible paradise

    EDEN

  • Star-shaped perennial

    ASTER

DOWN

  • Result of a bug bite

    ITCH

  • The Big Easy

    NOLA

  • Round snack for a runner

    ENERGYBALL

  • Boxing official

    REFEREE

  • Football six-pointers (Abbr.)

    TDS

  • Dessert denser than ice cream

    GELATO

  • Cricket field shape

    OVAL

  • Where ___ Our Love Go

    DID

  • Cunning

    SLY

  • Taking the show on the road

    TOURING

  • Palindromic name

    ANNA

  • Sorbet amount

    PINT

  • Eyelid problem

    STYE

  • Official state tie of New Mexico

    BOLO

  • Furnace fuel

    GAS

  • CCs the wrong person for example

    ERRS

  • Herb for pickles

    DILL

  • Lake bordering Ohio

    ERIE

  • Like some lingerie

    LACY

  • French friend

    AMIE

  • Not so many

    FEWER

  • Go girl!

    YOUCANDOIT

  • Only country that starts with O

    OMAN

  • Nimble

    SPRY

  • Formally relinquish

    CEDE

  • Had to pay back

    OWED

  • ___ arigato (Japanese for thank you very much)

    DOMO

  • Shuumi payment

    LANDTAX

  • Stretches out awkwardly

    SPRAWLS

  • ___-dish pizza

    DEEP

  • Zion National Park sight

    CANYON

  • World Vegetarian Day mo.

    OCT

  • ___ Romeo (Italian automaker)

    ALFA

  • Soothing application

    BALM

  • Oh right!

    ISEE

  • Starter chip

    ANTE

  • Get some shut-eye

    DOZE

  • Trade verbal jabs

    SPAR

  • Night before a holiday

    EVE

  • ___ Fulmer one of the Try Guys

    NED

  • Starfish’s home

    SEA

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The crossword-puzzle fad that followed eventually led to the creation of many similar puzzles in other newspapers, including some with distinctly different rules from the “New York Times”.

By 1930, Weng felt that the puzzle was growing stale. He wanted to shake things up a bit by adding an entire new level of challenge on top of what had been there before.

Weng called upon his friend Margaret Farrar (1904–1974) to help him edit and construct a brand-new cryptic crossword which would appear for the first time on Sunday January 2, 1932. The puzzle required entrants not only to fill in standard synonym squares but also to answer clues which required them to solve a second level.

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